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I spent an exhilarating week in the midst of the Los Angeles teachers strike—the first strike in 30 years by the second-largest teacher union in the country.
Of course wages and benefits were central to the teachers’ fight. But like many successful strikes, theirs was about something bigger—that the district should invest in public education as a public good, rather than stripping schools of their value and selling them off as parts.

Who will pay for a 5 percent raise, smaller classes, and more nurses, librarians, and counselors for the Chicago public schools? “Rich people,” Chicago Teachers Union Vice President Stacy Gates told the press.
Their contract expires in June. Meanwhile, fresh off the first charter school strike in history, the union set a February 5 strike date at another Chicago charter network.

Who will pay for a 5 percent raise, smaller classes, and more nurses, librarians, and counselors for the Chicago public schools? “Rich people,” Chicago Teachers Union Vice President Stacy Gates told the press.
Their contract expires in June. Meanwhile, fresh off the first charter school strike in history, the union set a February 5 strike date at another Chicago charter network.

L.A. Teachers Win Big and Beat Back Privatizers

January 24, 2019 / Barbara Madeloni<?
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?>In a joyful, rain-drenched strike, 34,000 Los Angeles teachers won things no union has ever won.
They forced Superintendent Austin Beutner, a former investment banker, to accept concessions even on topics he had previously refused even to bargain over.
L.A. will reinstate limits on class size—and for most classes, reduce those limits by four students by 2022.
Despite a pro-charter school board majority, the nation’s second-largest school district agreed to move a board resolution to support a statewide moratorium on new charter schools

L.A. Teachers Win Big and Beat Back Privatizers

January 24, 2019 / Barbara Madeloni<?
if(isset($entity->premium) and $entity->premium == 1)
{
echo "Print Only";
}
?>In a joyful, rain-drenched strike, 34,000 Los Angeles teachers won things no union has ever won.
They forced Superintendent Austin Beutner, a former investment banker, to accept concessions even on topics he had previously refused even to bargain over.
L.A. will reinstate limits on class size—and for most classes, reduce those limits by four students by 2022.
Despite a pro-charter school board majority, the nation’s second-largest school district agreed to move a board resolution to support a statewide moratorium on new charter schools

The Badger Coulee Transmission Line Project was a complete IBEW effort. The 180-mile transmission line runs through the hills of Wisconsin, bringing renewable and cost efficient energy to the Midwest.
David Effertz, Manager of Construction, American Transmission Company, said, “The Badger Coulee project is a joint project with American Transmission Company, ATC, and Xcel Energy. The project started in Middleton, Wisconsin, then flows north to Black River Falls, and turns west and heads towards La Crosse, Wisconsin. It allows access to renewable energy sources and reliable electric power.”
The 580 million project was completely manned by the IBEW, a joint effort between outside locals 2150 and 953. Everybody that worked out in the field was union (IBEW).
Paul Hartgerink, Business Agent, IBEW 2150, said, “953 and 2150 are like sister locals. We all work under the same contract, except they (953) control the Western part of the state and we control the Eastern.”
With so many tasks as a full-scale job such as this, it’s the perfect learning environment for an apprentice as they are exposed to new experiences everyday.
Jim Stuebs, Superintendent,...

Last week we interviewed Oshawa, Canada, auto worker Tony Leah about the plant occupation that rank-and-file workers organized to protest the planned shutdown of their General Motors factory. Meanwhile their national union, Unifor, held a rally on January 11 in Windsor, described below and in a separate report by Labor Notes Business Manager Adrian Montgomery.

Last week we interviewed Oshawa, Canada, auto worker Tony Leah about the plant occupation that rank-and-file workers organized to protest the planned shutdown of their General Motors factory. Meanwhile their national union, Unifor, held a rally on January 11 in Windsor, described below and in a separate report by Labor Notes Business Manager Adrian Montgomery.

Last week we interviewed Oshawa, Canada, auto worker Tony Leah about the plant occupation that rank-and-file workers organized to protest the planned shutdown of their General Motors factory. Meanwhile their national union, Unifor, held a rally on January 11 in Windsor, described below by Labor Notes Business Manager Adrian Montgomery.

Last week we interviewed Oshawa, Canada, auto worker Tony Leah about the plant occupation that rank-and-file workers organized to protest the planned shutdown of their General Motors factory. Meanwhile their national union, Unifor, held a rally on January 11 in Windsor, described below by Labor Notes Business Manager Adrian Montgomery.