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Seattle General Strike: Labor’s Most Spectacular Revolt

February 06, 2019 / Cal Winslow<?
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?>On February 6, 1919, Seattle’s workers struck—all of them. In doing so they took control of the city.
The strike was in support of 35,000 shipyard workers, then in conflict with the city’s shipyard owners and the federal government’s U.S. Shipping Board, which was still enforcing wartime wage agreements.

Steward’s Corner: Where Do Good Organizers Come From?

February 04, 2019 / Ellen David Friedman<?
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?>We know good organizers when we meet them.
They’re accessible. They listen and show respect. They react calmly to all kinds of people, take their time to size up a situation, and engage people on their own terms.
They brim with suggestions for action, but they’re open to new ideas. They’re not bossy. They always take workers’ side against employers—but among workers, they treat divisions with care and diligence.
They don’t act from fear, and they know how to help others lose their fear.

A Bad Day for Hoffa: Chicago Teamster Leader Joins Opposition Slate

February 02, 2019 / Alexandra Bradbury<?
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?>“The straw that broke the camel’s back for me,” said Chicago Teamsters leader Juan Campos, “was seeing the international shoving the UPS contract down the members’ throats.”
That’s why he decided to break his long silence on Teamster politics. After sitting out the 2016 election, Campos announced January 31 that he has joined an opposition slate to challenge the union’s top officers in 2021.
Campos will run for an at-large vice president seat, on the ticket with Sean O’Brien of Boston for president and Fred Zuckerman of Louisville for secretary-treasurer.

With the sixth anniversary approaching of the Rana Plaza building collapse that killed over 1,000 workers, conditions in the world’s second-largest garment export industry are tumultuous.

The new Klein-Kurve® Wire Stripper/Crimper Multi-Tool, made in Mansfield, Texas, was developed for the low voltage technician. Klein Tools received feedback that the technicians didn’t have one tool with the right range of stripping holes or crimping dies they needed, so they were carrying two tools with them. They decided this was the perfect opportunity to help the technicians save space in their tool belt by creating a tool with everything they need.
Klein Tools combined the stripping range needed, anything from 10 to 26, and they integrated four different crimpers on the tool including one for B connectors, one for insulated and non-insulated terminals, and one for IDC terminals.
Creating one wire stripper with all the different features technicians needed was a no-brainer for Klein Tools, and they put a lot of pride into it.
To learn more about this new tool, visit Klein Tools’ website.
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The post Watts New: Klein-Kurve® Wire Stripper/Crimper Multi-Tool appeared first on IBEW Hour Power.

Labor Notes: Forty Years of Troublemaking

January 29, 2019 / Jane Slaughter<?
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?>Everyone knows organized labor is on the decline. And yet bright spots keep flaring up.
Verizon workers in 2016 walked out on the biggest strike in years, proving that corporate giants can still be beaten with old-fashioned solidarity.
Chicago teachers struck in 2012, touching off a wave of teacher militancy that’s still washing over the U.S. Now all eyes are on Los Angeles.

Labor Notes is celebrating its 40th anniversary this year. We’ll periodically be sharing material from our archives, as well as organizing events across the country to commemorate 40 years of troublemaking—starting with our anniversary party in New York City on Friday, February 1.
The below piece, which ran on the front cover of Labor Notes #1 in February 1979, explains our founding mission, which guides us to this day.

Auto workers and supporters from three countries rallied last week outside a charity gala at the Auto Show in Detroit. We’re demanding that General Motors reverse its decision to close five North American plants, and possibly more.
And if GM refuses, we’re calling on local governments use eminent domain provisions and call for worker/community meetings to strategize about what is the best way to use the facilities for a possible Green New Deal.

Auto workers and supporters from three countries rallied last week outside a charity gala at the Auto Show in Detroit. We’re demanding that General Motors reverse its decision to close five North American plants, and possibly more.
And if GM refuses, we’re calling on local governments use eminent domain provisions and call for worker/community meetings to strategize about what is the best way to use the facilities for a possible Green New Deal.

I spent an exhilarating week in the midst of the Los Angeles teachers strike—the first strike in 30 years by the second-largest teacher union in the country.
Of course wages and benefits were central to the teachers’ fight. But like many successful strikes, theirs was about something bigger—that the district should invest in public education as a public good, rather than stripping schools of their value and selling them off as parts.