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‘People Are Starting to See That Winning Is Possible’: Denver Teachers Win, Oakland Next

February 19, 2019 / Samantha Winslow<?
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?>The teacher strike wave keeps gathering steam. After three days out, February 11-13, Denver teachers won a settlement that achieved their main goal—to dramatically reduce the effects of the district’s chaotic merit pay system.
Oakland teachers, meanwhile, have announced they will strike February 21.
The new contract in Denver will put more money into base pay and into steps and lanes, which reward teachers for their years of experience and level of higher education.

A Green New Deal for American Labor?

February 15, 2019 / Saurav Sarkar<?
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?>The simple yellow protest signs were stenciled “Green Jobs for All.” Speaker after speaker stepped into the middle of the office floor, marked with a U.S. House of Representatives seal. Representative-Elect Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, fresh off her election win, gave the protesters high fives.
That was the scene in November when the youth climate justice organization Sunrise Movement held a sit-in at the office of Rep. Nancy Pelosi, who was soon to be the Speaker of the House.
Most Americans had never heard of the “Green New Deal” at the time.

They did it to public workers. Next they want to do it to railroad and airline workers.
A right-wing policy think tank filed a Janus-style lawsuit against the Machinists on January 8, claiming that non-members shouldn’t be required to pay fees for union representation.
The plaintiffs are customer service agents at United Airlines. They’re covered by the Railway Labor Act, which governs unionization and collective bargaining for hundreds of thousands of union members who work for railways or airlines—from flight attendants to freight train engineers.

Thirteen thousand nurses may be on strike in March at three of the largest employers in New York City.
For several months, hospitals in the Montefiore, Mount Sinai, and New York Presbyterian systems have been bargaining jointly with the New York State Nurses Association.

In this job tip, IBEW member Joe shows how to make a retrieval hook out of fish tape. The retrieval hook will help when you push fish tape in a conduit and can’t get it out all the way.
The tools you need for this tip are fish tape and line hook line.
Step 1: Bend fish tape in the opposite direction of the head. Bend it all the way in as much as you can, make a small bend again, and make the third bend in the opposite direction.
Step 2: Now that there’s a gap, try to close it. This will make a smooth line across the base of the fish tape. When you send it into the pipe, it won’t hook onto anything except the spider on the other end.
For more helpful tips like this, visit the job tips section of our website.
 
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Seattle General Strike: Labor’s Most Spectacular Revolt

February 06, 2019 / Cal Winslow<?
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?>On February 6, 1919, Seattle’s workers struck—all of them. In doing so they took control of the city.
The strike was in support of 35,000 shipyard workers, then in conflict with the city’s shipyard owners and the federal government’s U.S. Shipping Board, which was still enforcing wartime wage agreements.

Steward’s Corner: Where Do Good Organizers Come From?

February 04, 2019 / Ellen David Friedman<?
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?>We know good organizers when we meet them.
They’re accessible. They listen and show respect. They react calmly to all kinds of people, take their time to size up a situation, and engage people on their own terms.
They brim with suggestions for action, but they’re open to new ideas. They’re not bossy. They always take workers’ side against employers—but among workers, they treat divisions with care and diligence.
They don’t act from fear, and they know how to help others lose their fear.

A Bad Day for Hoffa: Chicago Teamster Leader Joins Opposition Slate

February 02, 2019 / Alexandra Bradbury<?
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?>“The straw that broke the camel’s back for me,” said Chicago Teamsters leader Juan Campos, “was seeing the international shoving the UPS contract down the members’ throats.”
That’s why he decided to break his long silence on Teamster politics. After sitting out the 2016 election, Campos announced January 31 that he has joined an opposition slate to challenge the union’s top officers in 2021.
Campos will run for an at-large vice president seat, on the ticket with Sean O’Brien of Boston for president and Fred Zuckerman of Louisville for secretary-treasurer.

With the sixth anniversary approaching of the Rana Plaza building collapse that killed over 1,000 workers, conditions in the world’s second-largest garment export industry are tumultuous.

The new Klein-Kurve® Wire Stripper/Crimper Multi-Tool, made in Mansfield, Texas, was developed for the low voltage technician. Klein Tools received feedback that the technicians didn’t have one tool with the right range of stripping holes or crimping dies they needed, so they were carrying two tools with them. They decided this was the perfect opportunity to help the technicians save space in their tool belt by creating a tool with everything they need.
Klein Tools combined the stripping range needed, anything from 10 to 26, and they integrated four different crimpers on the tool including one for B connectors, one for insulated and non-insulated terminals, and one for IDC terminals.
Creating one wire stripper with all the different features technicians needed was a no-brainer for Klein Tools, and they put a lot of pride into it.
To learn more about this new tool, visit Klein Tools’ website.
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