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A recent decision by the Trump National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) addresses intermittent or “hit-and-run” strikes. Employers are jubilant and unions are distressed. Both reactions are largely off the mark.
The case grew out of a multi-year campaign by the Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW) to organize Walmart, the largest U.S. employer (1.5 million workers in 4,000 locations). The effort began in 2010 under the name “OUR Walmart.”

In this edition of job tips, IBEW brother Curtis shows how to efficiently terminate a RJ45.
Step 1 – Ring the out jacketing to remove the insulation.
Step 2 – Orient the cable so the orange pair is on the left, and the brown pair is on the right.
Step 3 – Separate the pairs using the outer jacketing. This is faster and helps prevent damaging. Start with the orange pair, and then move to the blue, green, and brown pairs.
Step 4 – Straighten out the conductors.
Step 5 – Trim the conductors.
Step 6 – Insert the RJ45 with the tab down.
Step 7 – Use the crimper to finish the termination.
This tip will help you mitigate errors, prevent damage to the cabling, and help you be more efficient on the job site. For more helpful tips, visit the job tips section of our website.
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The post Job Tip: Terminating a RJ45 Cable appeared first on IBEW Hour Power.

Steward's Corner: How to Respond If a Member’s Work Authorization Is Challenged

August 15, 2019 / Guillermo Perez<?
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?>Every major union in the United States has immigrant members, documented and undocumented.
Union activists and staff who represent these members need to be familiar with the ways these workers may be terminated—or worse still, detained—as a result of challenges to their authorization to work in the U.S.
In 2017 the AFL-CIO came out with an invaluable toolkit of materials to assist unions in responding to these challenges. More on the toolkit later, but first a quick review of how challenges to work authorization typically happen.

Teachers Fighting for Public Schools Were Key to the Uprising in Puerto Rico

August 15, 2019 / Mercedes Martinez and Monique Dols<?
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?>In the two months leading up to the uprising which ousted Puerto Rican Governor Ricardo Roselló, educators celebrated hard-fought victories against the privatization of their education system. Struggles by teachers and families against school closures and charter schools helped pave the way for July’s unprecedented outpouring of protest (see box).
By the end of the school year in June, it became clear that the struggle to stop charterization had largely won. There is only one actively functional charter school on the island.

This fall the NewsGuild will rerun its hotly contested presidential election.
In May incumbent Bernie Lunzer narrowly beat challenger Jon Schleuss of the L.A. Times local, 1,282 to 1,081. The NewsGuild, an affiliate of the Communications Workers (CWA), has about 20,000 members in the U.S. and Canada.

Miners in Harlan County, Kentucky, have drawn national attention with their direct action—occupying a railroad track to halt a coal train until the miners get paid the wages they are owed for digging it up. Although these miners today have no union, the mines of Harlan County have a storied history of grassroots labor militancy. Cal Winslow takes a look back. –Editor

The annual East Coast motorcycle ride is about camaraderie, brotherhood, and a chance to give back. It proves the IBEW isn’t just about learning a trade, but about the union between its members.
This is a ride that has become so popular because it never disappoints. The 2019 ride started out in Charleston, and made a big, 163-mile loop through the rolling mountains of West Virginia. Almost every rider agrees how awesome the rolling roads in West Virginia are. You focus on the road, and all the stress of home or work is gone.
The fact that everyone comes together to raise money for a great cause makes the ride even better. It has become customary for the brotherhood to extend a hand to charity. This year, they raised over $25,000 for the Gary Sinise Foundation and their Snowball Express program, which serves the children of fallen military heroes.
Jerry Westerholm took a moment to honor and remember International President Ed Hill who passed away within the past year. Patches were distributed to honor President Ed Hill, as he was one of the originators of the ride back when it was just a handful of brothers, and a yearly participant.
IBEW brother Sean...

Bangladesh Accord Gets a Lifeline While Workers Organize Wildcat Strikes

August 06, 2019 / Saurav Sarkar<?
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?>On April 23, 2013, a local television crew shot footage of cracks in the Rana Plaza factory complex in Dhaka, Bangladesh. The building was evacuated, but the owner of the building declared it safe and told workers to come back the next day. One Walmart supplier housed in the building, Ether Tex, threatened to withhold a month’s wages from any workers who didn’t return.
The building collapsed on April 24, and when the rubble was finally cleared, 1,134 people were found dead, with another 2,500 injured. It was the worst industrial disaster in the history of the garment industry.

Everyone loves a good story about an Amazon walkout. But when Labor Notes wades into more controversial waters—the pros and cons of a contract, for instance, or a race for union office—we can expect some angry letters.
“Let’s not criticize each other,” is a common refrain. “We get enough attacks from the boss! Airing disagreements gives ammo to union-busters.”

This is the latest installment in an occasional series where we evaluate the “union episode” of a television show.
The Simpsons debuted in 1989 and is the longest-running scripted primetime television series in the U.S. This animated show features the daily life of a working-class family—parents Homer and Marge, and their children Bart, Lisa, and Maggie—along with dozens of oddball residents of the town of Springfield.